Organization of Inclusive Education in China

  • Zeng Guanghai H.S. Skovoroda Kharkiv National Pedagogical University
Keywords: inclusive education, China, educational process, children with special educational needs, social justice.

Abstract

The article is devoted to the problem of organizing inclusive education in China, the ways of mastering the education by students with special educational needs, developing their personal qualities, ability to social interaction, achieving equality in education and social justice. Since the proclamation of the Salamanca Declaration in 1994, many countries around the world, including China, have been moving towards inclusive education. The article examines the history and directions of inclusive education in China. The author examines the experience of teachers in the organization of inclusive education, barriers and problems of development and implementation of Chinese inclusive education. The purpose of the article is to determine the main prerequisites for the organization of inclusive education in China. The main methods used in this study are the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature and open government regulations in the field of inclusive education in China.

The results. The author found that despite all the measures taken by the Chinese government, inclusive education still lags behind European countries, where children with disabilities are full members of society and are not perceived by others as "others". It is determined that special attention is paid to the study of inclusive education and the development of plans for the development of inclusive education. Given the need for inclusive education, which is a priority, inclusive education institutes and resource centers are being set up across the country. Conclusions. The main preconditions for the organization of inclusive education in China include the following: the inclusion of all children with different educational needs in traditional general secondary education institutions, which they could attend if they did not have a disability; the lack of "sorting" and selection of children, learning in mixed classes; the distribution of children with physical and mental characteristics by classes, according to their age; the situationally conditioned bulk interaction and coordination of resources and teaching methods; the use of decentralized learning models.

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Author Biography


Zeng Guanghai, H.S. Skovoroda Kharkiv National Pedagogical University

Zeng Guanghai
Postgraduate of the Department of Pedagogics,
H.S. Skovoroda Kharkiv National Pedagogical University,
29, Alchevskykh Str., Kharkiv, Ukraine, 61002
E-mail: 937732545@qq.com
ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1262-1512

Published
2020-11-24
How to Cite
Guanghai, Z. (2020). Organization of Inclusive Education in China. Professional Education: Methodology, Theory and Technologies, (12), 214-228. https://doi.org/10.31470/2415-3729-2020-12-214-228